stress

Super Foods Adaptogenic Hot Chocolate

Super Foods Adaptogenic Hot Chocolate

In the cold months, this is one of my go-to night time desserts. I used raw cacao, considered a super-food for it's high nutritient and antioxidant profile. Cacao also contains high levels of magnesium, the "calm mineral," so it's great for anyone dealing with stress or anxiety and good for night time. (If you're super sensitive to caffeine, you might not want this before bed however.)  I've also added ashwagandha, an ayurvedic and adaptogenic herb that nourishes your adrenal glands, helps your body deal with stress and fatigue, is good for memory and focus,  and stabilizes blood sugar.  You can also add maca powder, another adaptogen, to really up the adrenal-boosting properties, and collagen for a nourishing protein boost. Like all my recipes, it's naturally low-glycemic and is paleo-friendly.   The best part though is it whips up in the time it takes to heat up a cup of your milk on the stove, and is rich, chocolately, and just goooood.  I've been making it every night, and will continue to do so until I get tired of it. 

Almond Butter Bliss Balls

Almond Butter Bliss Balls

These almond butter bliss balls are an easy make-ahead snack that's perfect for that mid-afternoon slump, pre-workout, or even a quick breakfast on the go.  They're filled with protein and healthy fats to keep you satisfied and keep your blood sugar from plummeting (read: no hangries, or crazy cravings), and so tasty! I've added maca powder for some adrenal support, to help keep your bod and hormones balanced from all of life's stresses. 

A Surefire Strategy for Dealing with Stress

A Surefire Strategy for Dealing with Stress

Feeling stressed? I was feeling a little blah and uninspired the other day, but also really needed to do some creative brainstorming; not good match. And then I felt stressed about not getting my work done! So here's what I did - are you ready? 

I went for a walk in the woods. 

Mindfulness in Schools

Mindfulness in Schools

Mindfulness, meditation, being in the present moment - whatever name you give it, what was once reserved for the Buddhists, yogis, or new-agey folks is finally catching on as a legitimate practice in mainstream Western culture. And for good reason. Beyond just anecdotal evidence, Harvard has now scientifically proven the benefits of meditation on the brain. In the Harvard study, a group of participants spent an average of 27 minutes engaged in daily mindfulness exercises for eight weeks. Pre and post magnetic resonance images of the mindfulness participants found "increased gray-matter density in the hippocampus, known to be important for learning and memory, and in structures associated with self-awareness, compassion, and introspection." So meditation not only makes you smarter, it also makes you a kinder, more thoughtful person.